Aspiring young scholars earn college credits through dual enrollment

By Shane Soderland

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Lekeisha Hondy (right) and Maretta Konah (left) get information about dual enrollment from Assistant Director of Dual Enrollment, Susan Oakley (far left). Photo by Shane Soderland
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The Enrollment Services office, located on Marple campus in Founders Hall. Photo by Dean Galiffa

“Dual enrollment is a great way to earn college credit, and gain [both] social and working skills,” said Soortuu Tucho, a student at West Catholic Preparatory High School participating in DCCC’s Dual Enrollment Program.

The program, which offers surrounding high school students reduced tuition rates, enables students to choose from more than 60 majors.

Students can earn college credits as early as ninth grade and transfer these credits to a four-year university.

As stated on the college’s website, “As part of the college’s program, students will save significantly on tuition costs. Students from sponsoring school districts will pay just $55 per credit, while students from non-sponsoring districts will pay $110 per credit. This is almost a 70 percent discount on the college’s standard tuition rate.”

Patricia Shannon, assistant director of Enrollment Services, explained the qualifications students must have to be eligible.

“The high school students are given the privilege to start college early and they haven’t graduated yet, so they don’t have a diploma,” Shannon said. “They still have to take the placement test or give us qualifying SAT or ACT [scores].”

According to student testimonials provided by Shannon, dual enrollment students reap many benefits.

“I graduated high school with college credits by taking two college classes…[which] put me ahead of my peers,” said dual enrollment student Alexa Plachuta. “Because of that, I will not have a stressful first year of college.”

Upper Darby High School student Alexis Carlon said that the experience has been eye-opening for showing her how to prepare for the course load and campus environment.

Amira Porter praised the program for helping her with time management. Porter said she was able to adjust to the schedule and hopes to graduate high school with an associate’s degree.

Heather Shah agrees. “I felt as if it was much more interactive [which helped me] be more responsible,” Shah explained. “I also recieved credits that put me ahead of my curriculum.”

Joshua Kinsey, who attended classes at Pennock’s Bridge, appreciated the discounted rate for his first 21 credits.

“This was over a $2,000 savings in tuition,” Kinsey said.

Emily Catlett, an Upper Darby High School guidance counselor, discussed the rewarding aspects of the program.

“Start your college classes early, save time and money, enhance your college application,” Catlett said. “Increase your academic enrichment by taking college level courses while in high school.”

Shannon also touted the program’s convenience.

“One of the greatest benefits is the opportunity to know that you’re ready,” Shannon said. “[Individuals] can ease into the program by just taking one course.”

To be eligible, students must apply to and complete the enrollment process.

For more information, interested students should consult their high school guidance couselor and the college’s website:

https://www.dccc.edu/academics/programs/high-school-dual-enrollment

Contact Shane Soderland at communitarian@mail.dccc.edu